Go Back   Wiki NewForum > Career Forum

Top 10 Biggest Security Threats Of The Future


Reply
Views: 1241  
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-15-2008, 05:38 AM
supercool supercool is offline
Member
 
Join Date:
Dec 2008
Posts: 293
Default Top 10 Biggest Security Threats Of The Future

.
Who knew there were so many ways to become a victim of cyber crime? No doubt, the security landscape has significantly changed as financially motivated criminals create malware, infiltrate systems and steal valuable data and assets. But as security threats grow in size, scope and sophistication, so do the opportunities for channel partners to help businesses secure their networks and reduce the risk of attack. In Everything Channel's State of Technology: Security survey, hundreds of channel partners estimated some of the biggest threats we might see on the horizon through 2009.
Forbes' richest Americans announced


Trojans/Info Stealing Keyloggers/Fast Flux Botnets
Attackers often hit the jackpot with information stealing bots and keyloggers that sit silently on systems and steal sensitive and financial data—all completely unbeknownst to the user. Security reports indicate that more than 700,000 pieces of new malware have already been detected since January. And if current malware trends continue, this type of data-stealing malware will more than double in 2009. One of the most notorious Trojans is Storm. Also known as Nuwar, the Storm is the most versatile malware on record. And it is thus far unstoppable. The bot's creators released thousands of variants and code-changing techniques, creating the largest peer-to-peer botnet in history.



Cricket's super captains




Data Loss/Breaches
No one wants to become the next TJX. Data has become a business's most important asset—and cyber criminals know it. Consequently, cyber criminals will increasingly refine their attacks to get at the heart of a businesses' data center. Malware, delivered via blended threats and social engineering, is designed to stealthily swipe data off a user's computer and send it to offshore servers, where it is collected and then used or sold to the highest bidder on the black market. While financial data, such as Social Security numbers, credit card and bank account information will continue to be attractive targets, security experts say that criminals will increasingly focus on intellectual property, passwords and other types of identifying information.

TOP Indian Television Anchors
Internal Threats
Whether intentional or accidental, internal threats will continue to be one of the biggest security threats over the next 12 to 18 months. If a company's security policies are unknown or unenforced, users will continue to unknowingly engage in risky behavior, such as surfing unsafe Web sites, clicking on malicious links delivered via e-mails, or failing to encrypt sensitive data. As the workforce becomes increasingly mobile, users will further increase the risk of exposure by working on open networks with unencrypted mobile devices.




TOP Indian Reality Shows

Organized Cyber Crime
Gray Pigeons. Honkers Union of China. They sound like teenage garage bands, but in reality they are highly organized and complex cyber crime organizations. In the last two years, groups of hackers once loosely defined with a common goal have coalesced into complex multi-layered global networks. Sophisticated organizations like the Russian Business Network are responsible for creating and distributing much of the malware that is increasingly targeting businesses that span the market segments. And unlike other types of organized crime, cyber crime hackers can rely on their anonymity and international presence in order to avoid detection and escape the law.




India's TOP 15 best cities for IT-BPO growth

Phishing/Social Engineering
Considered a gateway to a larger "blended attack," social engineering is becoming more creative and targeted in nature. In a phishing attack, users will generally be enticed with an alluring e-mail subject line, often touting a fake breaking news headline or a celebrity video. Once the e-mail is opened, the user is treated to a brief message, and encouraged to click on a malicious link embedded in the message claiming to lead to another Web site or video. Instead, the link often links to an infected Web page, which installs malware on the unsuspecting user's computer. Social engineering has become so sophisticated, that attackers have begun to design e-mails specific to targeted individuals—usually executives and others with access to sensitive information—in what is known as a spear phishing attack


Why BPOs in India fail to retain good people

Viruses
While not posing the same threat as in years past, viruses still can wreak havoc on a company's network by infecting files and applications, costing a company thousands of dollars of lost production time. Viruses such as Parite, first detected in October 2001, infects its host file, Netsky, and drops executable malware. Other viruses, such as Virut, are polymorphic file infectors that download and run other malicious programs, meanwhile infecting all the executable files in order to replicate.




Hottest Bollywood Debuts, 2008

Cyber Espionage
Cyber attacks aren't just for stealing credit card numbers and social security information. Following Russia's invasion of Georgia, hackers from both countries escalated what some had termed an all out cyber war by hijacking news and popular Web sites each other's countries. Attacks on Georgian Web sites rerouted visitors and left many government and news sites defaced or blocked entirely. Security experts say to expect that cyber espionage will soon become a standard means of attack during international conflict.




No Age bar for IPL

Zero Day Exploits
Once hackers detect a security glitch in an application, it's only a matter of time before they develop malicious code to attack vulnerable systems before a patch is created. These vulnerabilities often affect Web browser and applications relegated to a specific platform. But recently, security researchers detected a variation of a cross-platform Domain Name Server vulnerability that can open the door wide open for what is known as cache poisoning attacks—tricking the DNS to accept an incorrect request which subsequently reroutes unsuspecting users to another, usually malicious, Web site. Once a user is rerouted to the malicious site, financially driven cyber criminals then have the ability to dump Trojans, keystroke loggers and an array of malicious payloads onto users' vulnerable computers. Meanwhile, attackers are working to develop malicious software that can automate Web browser vulnerability exploits, reducing the time it takes to exploit a system to seconds.




Provident Fund Full Details


Zero Day Exploits
Once hackers detect a security glitch in an application, it's only a matter of time before they develop malicious code to attack vulnerable systems before a patch is created. These vulnerabilities often affect Web browser and applications relegated to a specific platform. But recently, security researchers detected a variation of a cross-platform Domain Name Server vulnerability that can open the door wide open for what is known as cache poisoning attacks—tricking the DNS to accept an incorrect request which subsequently reroutes unsuspecting users to another, usually malicious, Web site. Once a user is rerouted to the malicious site, financially driven cyber criminals then have the ability to dump Trojans, keystroke loggers and an array of malicious payloads onto users' vulnerable computers. Meanwhile, attackers are working to develop malicious software that can automate Web browser vulnerability exploits, reducing the time it takes to exploit a system to seconds.




Television Top 10 Programs @ Click Here

Vishing
Security researchers have found that Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) attacks comprised more than double the number of security vulnerabilities in 2007 compared to all of 2006. While VoIP threats seem to be here to stay, the defensive technology is still playing catch-up. And while many users are becoming increasingly savvy to spam, phishing and other Internet related scams, that awareness doesn't always translate to voice protocols. Security experts anticipate a 50 percent increase in VoIP-related threats by the end of this year.
Reply With Quote
Reply

New topics in Career Forum

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Forum Jump


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.10
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.