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  #11  
Old 09-09-2017, 11:11 AM
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The "King of Fruits" becomes the "Forbidden Fruit"

However, for people with diabetes, mangoes are construed as a no-go fruit owing to their high sugar content. Most people with diabetes stay completely away from mangoes in fear of it affecting their blood glucose levels adversely.
The good news is that this need not always be the case! The general perception of living with diabetes is that that sweets need to be completely eliminated from the diet- this is a myth. The fact is that following a routine that strongly encourages healthy eating, fitness and regular monitoring of blood glucose, allows you to say yes to a bite of those sweet mangoes!

The Forbidden Fruit- no more!

Diabetes does not have to hold you back from enjoying the mango season. By keeping a careful watch over your health and blood glucose levels, you can make room for this fruit in your diet. Remember to regularly check your blood glucose throughout the day (as recommended) and keep an eye on those readings- they are an indicator of how much or how less of the fruit you can consume!
Source: http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/can-...oes-10060.html
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mango


Three diabetes-friendly drinks to keep your summer cool

Summer is upon us, and with it comes great ways to beat the heat that are also diabetes-friendly! Here are three delicious and super-easy drinks that you can make, to give this summer a cool and healthy spin!
  • Chocolate-Banana Shake The sweetness of chocolates and bananas combined! Blend two cups of fat-free milk, one sliced frozen banana and three tablespoons of unsweetened cocoa powder with two tablespoons of honey and a teaspoon of vanilla. This delightfully thick shake comes at just 23 grams of carbs!
  • Berry Smoothie The goodness of berries, served in a tall glass! Grab a cup of frozen unsweetened raspberries, fresh blackberries or blueberries, a cup of fresh baby spinach leaves and a cup of pomegranate juice. Combine them with 2 cups of frozen unsweetened strawberries and 3 tablespoons of nonfat dry milk powder, and voila- your berry smoothie is ready
  • Carrot-Mango Green Tea Smoothie Take healthy three ingredients forward! Add a cup of sliced carrots to 3 cups of boiling water. Cook for 10-15 minutes (throw in an inch of sliced ginger two minutes before you stop). Cut the heat and soak in 4 green tea teabags. Then, take out the teabags and ginger, and blend the cooled brew with 2 cups of frozen mangoes and a teaspoon of honey- triple flavour at just 17 grams of carbs!
Source: http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/...tea-smoothies/
Source: http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/...rry-smoothies/
Source: http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/...-banana-sipper

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  #12  
Old 09-09-2017, 11:11 AM
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Can people with diabetes eat mangoes?

Mangoes are a great source of Vitamin A, Vitamin C, fibre, antioxidants and several other nutrients. Pair their nutritious advantages with their sweet, nectary flavour, and they become quite the irresistible fruit, especially when they are in season.

However, people with diabetes often feel they have to completely avoid mangoes owing to the sugar content. This a common misassumption. The main objective of any diabetic diet is to keep blood glucose levels under control. This means that the aim is not to abstain, but to control portion sizes and be aware of the nutrition contents of all foods being consumed.

The good news is that as per global dietary guidelines, people with diabetes can consume about half a small mango or half a cup of chopped mango pieces. Having such a serving twice a week can even prove to be healthy for people with diabetes. Also remember to keep a check on your blood glucose levels regularly. Your blood glucose levels will reflect if you can have mangoes or not, helping you maintain a stronger control over your diet.
Finally, the best way to know is by checking with your doctor. Armed with your blood glucose patterns, visit your doctor to know how much or how less of mangoes can you have, and you may be surprised –you may be able to enjoy mangoes too.

Source: http://www.dailyo.in/lifestyle/sugar...y/1/10010.html



Holidays are a time to let loose and enjoy, and one of the most popular ways to do this is by savouring a multitude of different dishes. This can also be a buzz**** for the holidays for a person with diabetes as more often than not, these eatables are health hazards for them. So, as a person with diabetes, how else can you enjoy your holidays?
  1. Start your day early- Going for morning jogs helps you stay fit even on holiday, and gives a refreshing start to a whole day of fun!
  2. Take a Walk- Sightseeing is one of the most fun things to do on a holiday, and when you do this by walk, staying healthy becomes a fun activity.
  3. Laugh- Yes, that's right! Laughter is definitely the best medicine around, so find something to tickle your funny bone and give your holiday a positive boost.
  4. Learn about cuisines- The place you are holidaying at can have an intriguing cuisine. Don't second-guess its nutrition content. Finding out what foods you can enjoy and what you need to stay away from can be a great way to learn about its culture!
  5. Do something spontaneous- Diabetes doesn't hold you back from adding some spice to life. Pop outside for some coffee, catch a mid-afternoon movie or go shopping- small ways to have great fun!
Being a person with diabetes does not mean that you can have lesser fun during your holidays. Remember to monitor your blood glucose regularly so that you know your health status, consult your doctor before you set off on a trip, and most importantly, be prepared to have a great holiday!
Source: https://www.accu-chek.com/revitalize






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  #13  
Old 09-09-2017, 11:13 AM
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What is structured testing and how can it help me?

Structured testing is a way to support your daily routine of monitoring your blood glucose through more targeted data. How? By performing a set number of tests and check blood glucose over a short period at specific times of day while keeping your daily routine in place.
Structured testing helps you live your lifestyle and makes itfriendlier towards diabetes in the following ways:
  • Discover how to best use your numbers
  • See how certain activities can effect on your blood sugar levels
  • Problem-solve around highs and lows blood glucose levels
  • Identify blood sugar patterns when you do something apart from your routine
  • Discuss with your doctor if any adjustments are needed in your diabetes management plan
There are different ways to perform structured testing with Accu-Chek, depending on your goals.
  1. Pattern management The Accu-Chek 360 View is a simple paper tool that helps you track your blood sugar over 3 days, so you and your doctor can quickly identify patterns that can guide adjustments to your treatment plan. Know more about this tool - https://www.accu-chek.in/data-manage...0deg-view-tool
  2. Before-and-after testing: Try the Accu-Chek Testing in Pairs tool. This easy-to-use, printable tool helps you see changes in your blood glucose before and after you test. In just 7 days, you can see the effect a specific meal, exercise or other event has on your blood sugar. Find out more about this tool - https://www.accu-chek.in/data-manage...ing-pairs-tool
This can help you organize your numbers so that patterns pop out more easily. You can then discuss with your doctor to make any needed adjustments in your self-care. Take the next step in diabetes management with structured testing, and enjoy the benefits of a comprehensive blood glucose check at the touch of a finger.
Source: https://www.accu-chek.com/pattern-ma...lucose-testing

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  #14  
Old 09-09-2017, 11:13 AM
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Self-monitoring of blood glucose is an important measure in the management of diabetes. It provides you information about your blood glucose levels, helps you stay active, know what foods you can eat in and keep a track of your diabetes.
How does monitoring my blood glucose help me with diabetes

Monitoring your blood sugar daily and regularly can help you understand your health better as a person with diabetes. It can help you answer several questions about your day-to-day routine, instead of leaving room for doubt.
  • Are your medications working as they should?
  • How does the type or amount of food you eat affect your blood sugar?
  • How does activity or stress affect your blood sugar?
These are just some of the several questions you may have as a person living with diabetes.
Monitoring your blood glucose regularly is that it helps you and your doctor observe the trend in your health status and adjust your therapy accordingly. This in turn leads to healthier habits forming in terms of lifestyle, and can also tell you what foods and exercises you need to stay away from.
Don't miss out on the benefits of monitoring your blood glucose, when it is so easy to say yes to them. Start to self-monitor your blood glucose for a healthier lifestyle.
Source: https://www.accu-chek.com/testing-bl...-blood-glucose

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Old 09-09-2017, 11:13 AM
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What should my blood glucose range be?

Your blood glucose levels are very dependent on your activities. Your food, exercises you follow, lifestyle habits- all of these can cause your blood glucose level to increase or drop. The key to staying in balance is in monitoring your blood glucose at the right time, and understanding how it gets affected. This can help you determine next steps. Here's a handy list of how often you need to check your blood sugar:
  • Before each meal
  • 1 to 2 hours after each meal
  • Before and after physical activity
  • When you're feeling sick or stressed
Fluctuating blood glucose levels can affect your health and wellness in many ways! Low blood sugar brings sorrow, hunger, and exhaustion. You feel shaky, begin to sweat, and your head starts aching. If your blood sugar continues to drop, you will get confused, sleepy, irritable, and can even have seizures in a worst-case scenario.
In the event of high blood sugar, you may experience thirst, exhaustion, blurry vision, frequent urination, and rapid weight loss. Over and above this, you will feel nauseous, faint, and may even get a nasty stomach ache.
(Ensure that you tend to these medical emergencies when they occur. It is useful to have an ID card on you at all times that says you have diabetes and lists the medications that you have been prescribed.)
Here is a list of blood glucose readings for reference:
*Goals maybe more or less stringent for each individual basis their overall health status. Hence goals must be aligned with your doctor
Blood Glucose LevelsFastingTwo hours after mealsHbA1c
Normal person without diabetes70—99 mg/dl< 140 mg/dl< 5.7%
ADA recommendation for diabetics patients80—130 mg/dl< 180 mg/dl< 7.0%
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.c...d-sugar-level/
http://professional.diabetes.org/sit...tes_2017_0.pdf
http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/blood-sugar-levels#1-2

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