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Old 06-05-2009, 04:01 PM
bholus7 bholus7 is offline
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Default Are recruiters still following the `not-so-good-old-ways`?

Are recruiters still following the `not-so-good-old-ways`?

There are quite a few traditional recruiting practices that continue to yield fantastic results but that does not mean that everything done in the past was good. Recruiters must move on to catch up with talent.

The `old is gold` expression works well in quite a few things that modern organizations do. But taking this expression way too seriously, that too when competitors are using technology to surge ahead, only indicates an individual`s resistance to change for the better.

Unfortunately, there are a few recruiters who fall into this category. Given the talent crunch and little indications that things will improve, organizations cannot afford to lose out only because their recruiters refuse to move on.

Here are a few things organizations can do to spot such recruiters.

Old habits die hard

Blog fear: Blogs provide an excellent platform for recruiters to build a rapport with candidates outside their offices and cubicles. They are an informal medium where both recruiters and potential recruits get to exchange thoughts, share apprehensions and voice opinions.

Recruiters too are more likely to let their guard down and appear more approachable on their blogs.

These advantages aside, the biggest one is the opportunity to network. Bloggers have access to more online populations than people who limit their online interactions to e-mailing and chatting.
Text Messaging

A survey revealed that although only 20 percent of the adult population used text messages, 50 percent of the younger generation cannot think of a day that goes without text messaging their friends.

Not subscribing to this popular medium would only mean one thing- losing out on a powerful opportunity to tap this resource. The younger generation is easily impressed by `visibility` and stimulated effortlessly by technology.

Therefore, recruiters must think of different ways to communicate the same message to the same person repeatedly. An assured and cost-effective way to increase visibility amongst this growing mobile-reliant population is to use text messaging as well.

"The business newspapers keep me genned up." If a recruiter continues to believe that breezing through business papers and periodicals is enough to keep him updated on the latest then he definitely is old school.

This is the information-era and there is so much happening around the world that even if a recruiter wanted to, he would never know everything that happens in one business day.

The only way to remain almost current would be to use news alerts. Recruiters who do not get the latest news from online alerts will have little to comment on or say when they meet `updated` candidates.
Worried about molesters?

A corporate recruiter who does not have a profile of himself, as a recruiter, on a social networking site such as Facebook or MySpace is losing out on a huge opportunity to network and source.

Recruiters argue that their reputation is at the mercy of online molesters but the counter-argument is that molesters can use telephones, newspapers and any other available means.

While the fear of molesters is not unfounded, the other misconception with social networking sites is that only the very young subscribe to it. This however is not true.

The average age of MySpace users is 30 which is the ripe age in terms of recruiting. Social network sites allow for recruiters to retain their individuality even when they profile themselves as recruiters.

The lingo barrier
Even though English is the lingua franca, using just English can limit a recruiters global recruiting initiatives.

Employees are only going to get more diverse and making language a barrier will only compound a recruiter`s challenges.

Moreover, most jobs do not require employees to speak English fluently. Whenever possible a recruiter should make an effort to talk to a candidate in his native tongue.

Not out of our zone!
Everyone and anyone who wants to recruit will visit recruiting sites, both online and offline, as well as consultants.

However, what can set a recruiter apart and improve ;tremendously his chances of getting to talent before others is extending searches to unconventional sites and places.

There are opportunities to zone in on potential candidates in coffee cafes and restaurants (especially those outside major companies), in malls and at shows, but only if a recruiter is willing to look beyond the conventions.

Even online, social networking sites, blogs and chat rooms provide excellent opportunities to get to talent.
Picture power

The old school has no issues with believing that a picture is worth a thousand words but when it comes to putting it into practice, the prospect of using videos scares most of them.

Every candidate a recruiter comes across will be accustomed to the visual media; some even hooked to some form or the other (television, films or streaming videos). Top recruiters today keep their videos handy or have their online videos on top sites...........

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